Black Preaching Network

I have a question about black preaching style. Some blacks don't like what is traditionally thought of as a "black" preaching style. They say that you can't preach expository sermons with that style of preaching. I don't buy that. Look at Tony Evans.

What would you say to someone who objected to using a "black" style of preaching? How would you defend that style of preaching biblically? What about whites who have a black preaching style? Just some questions.

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Expository preaching is a method. Method has to do with the content of the message, particularly the way the scripture is used. A given method of preaching can be delivered in a variety of styles. Style has to do with the overall presentation, particularly the elements of oration (rhetoric, cadence, tone).

Expository preaching can certainly be done in the Black preaching style, but I cannot think of many of our preachers that faithfully use that method.
Just found on the internet (at the American Film Archive of North America website{?}) a fairly well-presented discussion of black preaching styles. The following is part of the introduction and a link to the article.


AN INTRODUCTION TO BLACK PREACHING STYLES

Geoff Alexander
December 10, 1986

INTRODUCTION

The art of oration may be one of the most underrated arts in the United States today, and one of the most under appreciated as well. Because most of our verbal information arrives through the medium of radio or television, with networks centered in New York or Los Angeles, much of our oratory has become homogeneous, containing the same inflections, colloquialisms, and dialect.

There is, however, one bastion of this art form which fights for survival on a weekly basis, and is pervasive enough that few people in this country live more than five or ten miles away from its auditorium: the Afro-American sermon. The black sermon is stated in the vernacular, with inflection and timing so musical that many have compared it in style to improvised jazz. Much of the sermon is improvised around a matrix both sacred and profane, and the style is cohesive enough that one can enter virtually any black Baptist, Methodist, or Pentecostal church from coast-to-coast and hear a sermon of similar form. This is assured in part by the congregation, which answers the preacher verbally at every opportunity, creating a call-and-response pattern, which often builds to a frightening intensity.


http://www.afana.org/preaching.htm
northern nigger---s

we dont listen to down south...
its a hebrew Klan thing...
jkn8
u see deus means trust in those who came from old...
Found another interesting take on the Black preaching style. An excerpt follows, and a link to the whole article.


The Black Preacher

During the Great Awakening of 1800 and for years after, many itinerant preachers found that their listeners for religious services often numbered in the thousands. To accommodate such large congregations, the camp meeting was institutionalized. These large-scale worship services were especially successful in the border states of Kentucky and Tennessee, where many clergymen from the North traveled. This new form of divine worship, sometimes attracting as many as 20,000 or more at events such as the one held at Cane Ridge, Ky., included black as well as white worshipers. Although this form of worship never caught on in the Northeast, it was highly successful in the South and Southwest. Many black ministers were inspired to preach at such gatherings, though at first only to other blacks, and a characteristic oral style of delivery emerged from this experience.

These sermons were characterized by the preacher's chanting the Word of God rather than delivering it conventionally. The sermon began traditionally enough with a statement of the day's text and its application to contemporary morals. Then, as the preacher got further into the day's message, he began to chant his lines, the metrics and time intervals of the lines became more and more regular and consistent, and as he became further imbued with the Holy Spirit, the preacher's delivery slid into song. The sermons were-and still are-characterized by an increase in emotional and spiritual intensity, expressed by the gradual transition from conventional pulpit oratorical style, through chanting, to highly emotional singing. Many black folk preachers are excellent singers and have had several years' experience with church choirs, if not on the professional stage. Quite a number have been choirmasters, and nearly all these men have from an early age attended church services in which music played a major role. A musical sense has thus been acquired, and its rhythms, intonations, timbres, and verbal phrasing are inextricable parts of the tradition.


http://www.arts.state.ms.us/crossroads/narrative/church/na4_text.html
try fort moshe or the negro fort...
google samites...
or nolas
Afro-American

what the heck is an afro -american...
i been deus all my life...
If there is a singular "style of God," ---said the tarman...
...if there is one styls of god...
very loaded point...
there is only one style of god...
know the spirit by the spirit...
kc
ii object to northern negro period across the board the same as with yankees across the board...
Most of the preachers that I listened to when I was a young believer were black or had a black preaching style. They include: T.D. Jakes, Creflo Dollar, Fred Price, Rod Parsley, Dennis Leonard, Clarence McClendon, Donnie McClurkin, Paula White, Juanita Bynum, etc.

As I moved away from Pentecostalism, I started to listen to other people like Mike Bickle, John Piper, Mark Driscoll, Francis Chan, Tony Evans, Voddie Baucham, Thabiti Anyabwile, Sam Storms, Joshua Harris, Tope Koleoso, etc.

I could go into all of the doctrine involved in the changes that God brought in my life, but for now the concern of this thread has more to do with style than substance. I'm considering some of the implications of preaching the sort of doctrine that someone like John Piper preaches but preaching it in the style of someone like T.D. Jakes, Rod Parsley, Kenneth Ulmer, or Tony Evans.
Most of the preachers that I listened to when I was a young believer were black or had a black preaching style. They include: T.D. Jakes, Creflo Dollar, Fred Price, Rod Parsley, Dennis Leonard, Clarence McClendon, Donnie McClurkin, Paula White, Juanita Bynum, etc

what the heck is a black preachering style and when did a preach began to style--
this stupid---
the black church is BET live...the only style any preacher should have is the Style of God---all the above preacher follow or cow tow to the euro---thus the sound negriod but are devoid of the negro Gods...
they preach the gods of the euro...
great preacher should walk as did queen esther....



not be in queer positions...

http://darkherbrews.ning.com
...the only style any preacher should have is the Style of God...

If there is a singular "style of God," how do we account for the differences in tone, rhetoric, meter, approach, etc., among the bible writers themselves? Why doesn't the prophet Jeremiah's book--so rich with personal anguish and internal struggle--read like Ezekiel's--steeped visionary imagery--even though the two men were contemporaries? Why doesn't James' epistle, with its scattershot proverbial approach reminiscent of the wisdom literature, more closely resemble Paul's free-flowing conversational tone in his letters?

Preaching styles can vary just as writing styles varied. Style of speech has to do with the how the message is organized. Does the preacher prefer pedagogy (a deductive explanation of the scripture verse by verse) like a John MacArthur, or heralding (a bold declaration of the larger themes of scripture in dramatic fashion) like a Billy Graham, or narrative (a subtler recitation of the gospel through anecdote and illustration) like a Max Lucado? But style also has to do with oral presentation. What rhetorical devices (alliteration, assonance, rhyme, ect.) does the speaker use? Is the speaker's language characterized by inflections, colloquialisms, or dialect? What kind of musicality is there? Finally, style has a physical component. How does movement (gestures, bodily motion) play a role? Where on the spectrum of formal dress (from ecclesiastical vestments to blue jean informality) does the preacher fall?

Style is broadly manifested.
style is not how u sound or look --
but who u are and style aint never been a class act...
keep ur style i perfer my classic..
kc

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